Do I need to rototill old flower bed? – REGENERATIVE.com

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  deanna 3 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #56978

    diggins.christopher
    Participant

    I have a flower bed which had flowers in it for 3 years and weeds and I put weedblock on it this past winter and killed off everything. Now I want to put flowers in it again. It is hard packed and if I just throw seeds on it, it won’t grow flowers, I am sure.

    Can I put a thin layer of top soil and then seeds?

    Please advise, Christopher

    #56980

    perma
    Participant

    I thought weed blocking type mats would be more useful when used with larger plants. Then you could cut slits into the mat and position around your plants.
    If you are putting a layer of soil on top of your weed block, sure, your flowers would grow, but so would other seeds that land on top of it.
    May be cut holes/slits into the matting so you can sow seeds? But I guess that wouldn’t be the “random” permaculture way. Just a thought.

    #56984

    diggins.christopher
    Participant

    no I was not clear… I just used weedblock to kill weeds. Now it is removed and I have bear ground with no weeds and ready to work.

    #63693

    deanna
    Participant

    Just wondering how your flower bed turned out?

    I agree that flowers wouldn’t grow on hard packed ground. I would double dig a place with compacted soil and then leave the surface of the bed rough and uneven. I would throw out a variety of seeds and water it well. The water will cause the seeds to work their way down into the nooks and crannies. After that, never do anything that would cause the soil to become hard and compacted again. Pull out unwanted plants by the roots and put them on the soil as a mulch under the other plants. This will keep the soil loosened. Leave all the spent plants in place during the winter and they will create a sort of mat over the soil with more nooks and crannies for seeds to fall down into. Gradually over the years a more natural soil system will build up.

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