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This topic contains 5 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Teresa 4 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #22281

    trisha
    Participant

    We purchased our house 2 years ago and always knew we’d have to remove a christmas tree someone planted 25 years ago right in front of the house and over the sceptic tank–duh. It’s now so tall and so shallow-rooted that it’s a risk factor since we have a lot of strong winds. I’ll be sad to see it go because the shade was nice and it housed a ton of birds in winter, but I’ve basically accepted it.

    The thing that upsets me is that we also have a very old poplar that apparently was snapped in half by strong winds in the 80’s. These things get huge here in France and it’s trunk is about 4ft in diameter. It’s also pretty close to our house and in order to keep it wind safe for us and the neighbors, we’d need to climb up high and trim it back with a chainsaw often–it’s crazy to see how fast it’s grown back in just the time we’ve been here–in addition, it’s in poor shape and apparently has only a few more years to go. . .or maybe ten. We want to start a mini-fruit tree orchard a little farther down the hill, so we feel like we need to take the poplar out first as its removal would cause dammage to any new trees planted nearby. It just makes me so sad to remove it though. It’s been here longer than the house and literally the site under this tree has the best soil on our little rocky hillside plot. And it’s a native tree unlike that crazy Christmas tree we have growing right out front.

    We intend to burn the leftover wood in our stove (except that trunk, we’ve got no way of splitting it!!) And any scraps I know I can use in the garden. . .it just seems like such a waste.

    I’ve been told that sometimes a tree like that can take off again from the stump and therefore to ‘kill’ the stump. But I’ve been toying with the idea of letting it take its course. Any branches that grow out of trunk will be within reach so we can cut them back ourselves to keep it at a safe height and perhaps the root system will be able to keep going. . .the leaves will keep falling. . .

    What do you think?? Any ideas welcome.

    #22306

    Russ
    Participant

    Hello Trisha, in my experience I would say that safety should be at the forefront of any decision when it comes to tree removal. My cousin was killed in a logging accident, and he was an experienced faller. I have removed several trees around my home mostly big leaf maple, that had dead tops and hollowing in the trunks. After harvesting any good wood for firewood, I used the dead wood for a base in a few Hugelculture style raised beds. The trees have since come back strong, and I can now harvest the new wood for hoop houses and other light structures, and the wonderful edible blossoms that arrive in the spring are once again in reach with a small step ladder.
    Do not fret, a dangerous tree should be removed.

    #22309

    trisha
    Participant

    Thanks! I am slowly resigning myself to the inevitability of those trees going (or else being blown over in an unplanned way!). We’re digging the holes for the new trees even before the old ones come out. And yes, we’re relying an an experienced tree remover with insurance! Part of the reason we’re doing away with the poplar is because I don’t want my husband climbing up that thing every few years with a chainsaw to keep it under control.

    And I had just discovered the Hugelculture raised beds–I think that will be perfect in a few places in our yard. We’re on quite a slope, the soil is minimal and not so great. I’m hoping to use the wood to help my raised beds ‘stick’ to the hillside and I think all the biomass of that poplar tree is going to really improve the garden beds.

    #37619

    Teresa
    Participant

    When I was a kid we had several very large acacia trees in our yard. they got a fungal infection but were so nice we decided to leave them and cut them down once they began dying. Then came a nice big thunderstorm. One tree fell onto the house and caused permanent damage to the roof, we still have issues with leaks even though its been repaired multiple times. The other tree fell onto the wall between us and our neighbors causing a couple of broken windows and damage to the wall.

    We no longer wait with trees capable of causing damage. Cut it down ASAP. I see no problem with letting it regrow so long as the new tree does not become the same problem.

    Also we found logs make awesome flower bed boarders and benches, so don’t give up on the trunk just cause you cant split it.

    #37624

    trisha
    Participant

    Teresa,

    The trees are already gone! The spruce I think we’ll maybe use for something like a planter or stools or what have you. The poplar gives me the shivers. Once it was cut down, we could see that inside the trunk the core was like soggy bread–you could just scoop it out with your hand! I’m using that for organic matter for my garden.

    And then we have wood to burn. And I think we won’t let the poplar regrow–they just get too high!

    #37640

    Teresa
    Participant

    Hi Trisha

    Glad you got the tree down in time! Hopefully this thread will stop someone else from making the mistakes we did. I am glad you got more use out the tree than expected as well.

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