13 Reasons to Establish a Home Permaculture Food Garden

Starting a permaculture garden at home is possible even if you don’t have much space. Even a relatively small plot of land can produce a variety of foods to help feed you and your family. If you are wondering whether to establish your own kitchen garden, here are some reasons why you should go ahead.

Provides Food Safety
By growing your own food, and knowing what you are inputting into the ecosystem on which it grows, you can feel secure knowing that you can feed yourself and your family with unadulterated, fresh food, even in times of shortage.

Attracts Wildlife
A kitchen garden attracts wildlife. The plants and trees provide habitats for birds, mammals and insects. A healthy soil also provides an environment for microorganisms to thrive, which in turn will help your plants to flourish. And if you have room for a pond, the diversity of the species attracted is increased again.

Conserves Biodiversity
This diversity is another reason to establish a permaculture food garden. By planting a wide variety of species and welcoming as diverse a range of wildlife as possible, you create an ecosystem rich in biodiversity. This helps, even if in a small way, to counter modern food production practices that are typically monocultures.

Reduces Your Carbon Footprint
Your carbon footprint – the ecological damage via greenhouses that your way of life has on the planet – is reduced if you eat food from your garden. By avoiding supermarket produce, even just for some of your food, you reduce the carbon cost of transporting foodstuffs to shops and the energy and water used to package it.

Uses Waste For Positive Functions
A permaculture garden is designed to minimize waste. In fact, it seeks to turn what is commonly considered to be waste into useful products. So, the food scraps from your kitchen become compost, old jeans become mulch, and it may even be possible to recycle the greywater from your bathroom and laundry for use in the garden.

Saves Money
Growing your own food, particularly when employing the techniques of permaculture saves you money. From a single packet of seeds, you can grow many plants, which can then be propagated for no extra cost. You also avoid paying the coasts associated with supermarket food, such as transport, packaging and labour costs.

Preserves Heirloom Species
Modern agricultural practices tend to use manufactured seeds. A permaculture food garden is a great opportunity to preserve heirloom species – those that have been unadulterated by modern industrial processes and are part of the natural heritage of a location. There are now concerted efforts to preserve these species, and using them in your own food garden enables you to play a part in that effort.

Adds Variety
In your own permaculture kitchen garden, you get to decide what ‘products’ are available. You can plant a wide variety of different foods (depending on the space available and the local climatic conditions, of course) to make your diet broader. You can also plant different varieties of certain plants to ensure a year-round supply. You will no longer be limited by what the local shops have in stock.

Gives You Fresh and Nutritious Food
permaculture food gardenNot only does growing your own food mean you can expand the variety of foods you eat, and know that they are unadulterated with chemicals, you also get to experience the taste of the produce at its freshest. Digging up a potato, plucking some broad beans, or snipping off some herbs, carrying them straight to the kitchen and incorporating them into a meal gives the most flavour, as the produce hasn’t had the time to deteriorate. The other substantial benefit of this short time from harvest to table is that food retains a greater proportion of its nutritional content, making the food from your garden better for you.

Offers Exercise and Stress Relief
While a permaculture garden is designed so as not to require too much effort, there is always something to do in it, even if that something is just enjoying being outside in nature. While permaculture gardening won’t get you in shape for a marathon, walking around to monitor its progress, composting, mulching and pruning all offer a chance for a bit of exercise. The garden also provides a space to get away from the stresses of modern life, offering a meditative place more attuned to the rhythms of nature.

Provides Opportunities for Sharing
Often, a permaculture garden will give you an abundance of produce − so much that you couldn’t eat it all. This gives you the opportunity to share the fruits of the earth with your friends, family and neighbors. But even if you have a very small plot, you can still enjoy sharing. Perhaps your neighbors grow types of vegetables that you don’t and vice versa. Suggest a swap so you can both widen the range of your menu. Sharing any surplus your garden creates is an integral part of the permaculture vision, and it applies not only to food but also wisdom.

Provides Opportunities for Learning and Teaching
Growing your own food is an opportunity for learning. And as your garden develops so too will your knowledge. You will learn how different elements and inputs of an integrated ecosystem, such as soil, sunlight and moisture, interact to create healthy plants, as well as learning new skills and perhaps something about yourself and the things you consider to be important.

And one of the best things you can do with the things you’ve learnt is to teach them to other people. This could mean getting your kids involved in the garden, so they learn about how food is produced, or helping neighbors to get the most out of their own gardens.

Gives Self-Fulfillment
You have set up a permaculture garden, successfully grown vegetables that your have eaten straight from the land. You have done so while respecting the planet and making every effort to minimize the negative impacts of modern food production. That’s should give you a great sense of self-fulfillment.

25 comments

Yay, now I’ve got more ideas haha. X

That’s right! Don’t just post Memes about the dangers of GMO foods. Take action – which starts with your food purchases.

Grow it, Judy!

thank you for sharing this! 🙂

Money is an illusion based on the (illusions of) fear of scarcity and greed. Money empowers the less than 1% to control the masses. If you follow the money, you know who the biggest criminals (“employed-slave” traders, resource-starved war-mongers murderers, bio-chemical weapon genocidal-maniacs whom poison our water, soil, air and food) are… those that have robbed us of our Creator-given rights to Life, Liberty and Security. (Read the Preamble of the US Constitution *carefully* — the right to pursuit happiness is the same as liberty–it replaced your Creator-given right to security.) KNOW your Creator-given rights and RESPECT these right in others is the Key. Money will continue to be the reigning power until ALL of us decide enough is enough. SHARING is the natural way, the Creator’s Way of operating. Money has created a war against poverty, houselessness because the Poor are the guardians of YOUR basic rights. Cleverly design social programs and laws have generated hatred towards the Poor to distract you from these basic Truths. The true crime is a lack of compassion, lack of sharing. Media does not have the freedom of speech, because it is bought and paid for through advertisement. Media only tells you what the advertisers want you to believe, a twisted, distorted version of truth. Our government is no longer for the People, but instead for money. Only by removing “money” from our world will we ever truly be Free, Independent! We must shift to a new paradigm world-wide! https://www.facebook.com/groups/whiterosenow

Is this permaculture? All i do is feed the fish 🙂 its my way of gardening in december. Its also apartment friendly if u needed it to be.

The start of one. I’ve got a lot of work to do though before its fully functional and sustainable.

Have stated one here, am currently working on water catchment…

The Jasper-Local Food-Society started one in the Rocky Mountains. Boreal and Mountain climate, soils and light seasons make permaculture very different from more southern, temperate, regions!

In Iowa – 1/2 in process

1/2 well on it’s way. We have dozens of deer that come in a day and were forced to fence in 2 years ago. My hubby loves mowing the lawn for some odd reason so this is all I can talk him into …. for now 😉 Looking forward to retirement and helping my kid and her husband go permaculture (they are both civil/environmental engineers)

Mulched Kitchen garden in the front yard and chickens preparing the crop garden out back.

Does the passionfruit vine climbing up the bottle-brush tree count? lol

Stew Stewart

One fact is potatoes are “fixed” so they don’t grow sprouts. Potatoes can be grown in draining buckets. Make a wall that can support lettuces and herbs. There are so many ways to grow veggies, use your imagination.

already planning mine… got some collard trees and moringa trees started to plant this spring. Working on citrus trees also….

Well I’d be started i this blame weather would just warm up.

I am a member of Permaculture and plan to do this in the spring.

I am planting a Food PermaCulture Forest and Food Garden at my Lorge Honey Capital Hill Farms this spring.

For the beginners out there. I found that my local library had some great books. A very easy starter method was to buy a huge bag of gardening soil. poke holes in one side of the bag and then flip it over and cut 2 big out of the top….. plant right into the bag. This can be done on patios and balconies too.

I think this is more along the lines of aquaponics. Permaculture is integrating nature around your planting. This is a great idea…how do you have it set up?

I plant several gardens every year ….I had really good luck last year planting lettuce in one of those large hanging baskets with the liners in it that I reuse every year…..I was able to keep picking all summer…..good thought for those who live in an apartment or something………

Danielle Paterson

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